I Was Roofied Twice: Idiot Feminists Oppose Prevention

Vulnerability.

It’s something we all experience at some point in our lives. It is not gender specific.

When I was in college I made the mistake of leaving my drink unattended at a bar when I went to dance. I was young and naïve. I hadn’t ever heard of a date rape drug. But somebody slipped one into my drink.

Thankfully I was with friends who took care of me. I have always had a tendency to have more male friends than female friends. Maybe it’s because I’m a bit of a tomboy. Perhaps it’s because I grew up in a neighborhood that was dominated by boys. I don’t know the exact reason. I do remember my friends trying to figure out who did this with the intent of beating him to a pulp. My friends very well may have saved my life.

That evening I realized how valuable friendship really is.

I learned from the experience. I made it a habit to never leave my drink unattended and I don’t accept drinks from people who aren’t in my inner circle.

I didn’t blame the culture and I didn’t blame men as men rescued me from the situation.

I was out with a friend earlier this summer and had to use the bathroom. For the first time in over twenty years I left my drink unattended. There was hardly anyone there. I looked at my glass wondering if I should abandon it. I thought, “I’m in my 40s and this is probably something I don’t need to be concerned about anymore.” When I returned, I finished the drink and left with my friend.

A while later, I started feeling really strange. There was really no reason for this as I hadn’t had much to drink. As time passed and I keep feeling more and more disoriented, I realized that I had found myself roofied again. Three hours later I was a full on train wreck. Again, I was thankful that I was with a friend.

I’d like to point out that you don’t have to be drunk to be roofied. You don’t even have to be drinking alcohol. Someone can just slip something into your iced tea or water.

When I read about a new nail polish that could detect date rape drugs, I thought that was brilliant. I’ll gladly choose a manicure over being roofied again.

But, within seconds I knew the feminists would be outraged. Right on cue, they came out spouting that this nail polish was not addressing the “culture of rape,” as if that is the responsibility of an entrepreneur.

This is the equivalent to refusing chemotherapy to treat cancer to make a statement that we need an overall cure to cancer. Your principled stand will only get you a trip to the morgue.

I have been on the wrong side of these drugs twice now. It has never occurred to me to place the blame on any culture. Even with other obstacles I have encountered in life, I have never thought of myself as a victim. I learn from the situation and I work to avoid those situations in the future.

Instead of cornering myself into the role of victim, I would rather empower myself by preventing these things from happening again.

Pretending evil doesn’t exist doesn’t solve problems. Preparing for evil and learning to combat it, does. Sometimes the battle comes to you when you aren’t expecting it. And you have to be on guard.

Because you never know when you will be vulnerable.

21 Responses to “ I Was Roofied Twice: Idiot Feminists Oppose Prevention ”

  1. I understand Kelly’s comment and I understand your article. Neither are wrong. But I’d like to say that the nail polish isn’t wrong, it’s just the fact that we have to have so many preventative measures when it comes to rape that it seems to lessen the severity of rape in society’s eyes. Got roofied? Oh well, as long as you have your nail polish! It’s great we have these defenses against possible attacks but the problem is that we have to always defend from these attacks in the first place. I know Kelly and the other wouldn’t say the polish is a bad idea, the conversation just needs to change. Yes, we teach boys not to rape, but then there are also so many signals in society that tell them “oh it’s not that bad, comedians are joking about it!, they can prevent if if they want to, if they wear a short skirt they were asking for it!”

    • “…there are also so many signals in society that tell them “oh it’s not that bad, comedians are joking about it!, they can prevent if if they want to, if they wear a short skirt they were asking for it!””

      Well, yes and no. Comedians joking about it would qualify. Two other cultural sources would be self-esteem indoctrination that essentially tells all that ‘you deserve to get what you want’ is also cultural; a second is materialist culture that devalues moral underpinnings of right and wrong, good and evil.

      But if the girl is dressed provocatively and places herself in a risky situation it’s like walking down south Chicago dark alleys with $100 bills hanging out of your pockets…you are going to get mugged because there’s a violent streak in human nature that has nothing to do culture and society.

    • Kelly said the nail polish is great *IF*. Her qualifier tells me that she doesn’t believe it’s great because we all think women *ARE* trying hard to “not get raped.”

      These preventative measures do not lessen the severity of rape, they…well, help prevent rape. They also would aid in putting these people behind bars. If someone buys a drink for my friend, and she realizes it’s drugged, then we have a short list of people responsible.

      If this came in a clear polish, I’d wear it on a finger when I go out. Date rape drugs aren’t only given to women, and the drugs aren’t only used for rape. Compliance is the desired result, against the target’s will.

      Rachel’s comment says it best: “This is the equivalent to refusing chemotherapy to treat cancer to make a statement that we need an overall cure to cancer.” This isn’t a cute analogy trying to get an emotional response, this is common sense. Problems sometimes have solutions that should work in theory, but don’t work as intended when applied. That doesn’t mean that we should stop finding other ways to solve the problem, or at least minimize its impact. I’ll continue to be the man my mother wanted me to be, and the man that my wife fell in love with, but I’ll take any advantage I can get for those two women to protect them against men who don’t live their lives like I do my own.

    • I can’t see why I’d allow some neanderthals and idiots attitudes to affect what I thought of a new technology which increased my ability to protect myself.

      Should women also not carry mace because doing so “doesn’t address the culture of rape”? Should installing a security system in your home be frowned upon because it “doesn’t address the culture of crime”?

      Rachel hit the nail on the head with her chemotherapy comment.

      Until the world becomes what we would like it to be, it’s only wise to deal with it as it is.

      There’s something else the complainers don’t consider … it may well be that things like the nail-polish help bring about the world they’d like to see.

      Suppose, for a moment, that Rachel was wearing the nail polish at the time of her first incident, had tested her drink after returning from the dance floor, discovered it had been drugged and, because they’d discovered it immediately rather than after the drug began to affect Rachel, her friends had been able to identify the person who did it to her. Think that evening would’ve turned out differently?

      Do you think the number of “roofie rapes” would drop if use of the nail polish became widespread? That the number of perpetrators being discovered & dealt with would go up? Isn’t it possible that changing the odds of getting caught would have an effect on the number of incidents?

      Yes, it would be nice if no one even dreamed of doing such a thing to a woman. It’d also be nice if there was no more war, or cancer, or heart attacks, or any disease, or poverty, or ……

      But that’s not the world we live in – it’s not the world ANY OF US live in.

      Kelly’s comment is wrong. She’s looking at a new tool for her toolbox and whining about it; apparently, the safety of women is everyone else’s responsibility, and the notion that it’d be wise to take some precautions herself is outlandish.

      Apparently, Kelly subscribes to “princess feminism” – no responsibilities, it’s everyone else’s job to take care of her.

    • A detection method does not, I repeat, does not lessen the crime in any way. In fact a person attempting this criminal act will now have a harder time. Let us play this scenario out how you think this new detection method will be viewed socially and criminally.

      Amy is alone and gets her drink spiked. She doesn’t feel well and leaves. She is assaulted and is found hurt later. Now her friends and society say oh why didn’t she use the nail polish. In court they say the same thing. By lack of prevention the case is tossed out.

      That is BS. Amy wasn’t asking for it, being drugged. She is a victim of a crime, period. She has the right to not have to wear any tool to prevent rape or at minimum being drugged. She did not ask for it.

      Now Amy does have the nail polish, the drug is slipped in by someone who is very good at it. She tested the drink earlier and still got drugged. She is assaulted and hurt. She had a tool to defend herself and even then did not stop her from becoming a victim. Did she ask for it? Heck no. She wore the nail polish but still became a victim.

      Amy periodically checks her drink in her hand. She notices it has been spiked at some point. She alerts the staff. They change out all the drinks, alert security (whatever that is) and the person(s) attempting the crime is on the defensive. Amy is empowered, the criminal on the run, maybe even literally.

      In any scenario Amy did nothing wrong preventative nail polish or no. A new tool to combat rape should be welcomed immediately not rejected because of foolish people who think women like Amy have it coming by consuming a drink of any kind.

      What if the tool were any establishment that dispenses drinks put a chemical in a drink that turned it black (or whatever) if it was spiked? Would that be better?

    • Kelly’s comment is that of a bigoted fool who has never been in the real world. I suggest she go spend a week in Saudi or in Hamas controlled territory and find out what a real rape culture is like. Another stupid enough to say that shouldn’t be allowed out.

      The denial of human evil and the belief somehow we can change it is a damned lie. Does that twit think men who rape don’t know it’s wrong?

  2. Good stuff. You’re now on my list of daily reads. Your Twitter handle, please?

  3. Great article – loved the chemotherapy analogy. I am stunned that the “feminists” are so outraged over a cool product that empowers women to be safe. It’s like not locking your front door to protest crime – not wearing your seatbelt because drunk driving is wrong – the list is literally endless, and these women are clearly clueless.

    As a dad with a 12 year old (going on 23) daughter, I applaud anything that allows women to protect themselves. As a human being, I applaud anything that allows my fellow human beings to protect themselves.

    And so happy that you came out of your multiple “roofie” experiences relatively unscathed. It’s sad how many women are not fortunate enough to have friends looking out for them under similar circumstances.

  4. The logic of the feminists above does not make any rational sense even from an emotional response.

    Logic, usually a man’s way of tackling a problem, to the crime of drugging a woman is a method of detection. How will any man know which woman is protecting themselves. Every woman now at minimum appears to be defending themselves. It is the same as conceal and carry of a firearm. How can any man or woman know which person is armed for defense?

    By decreasing the chance of being drugged decreases the chance of raped. However by logic we also understand the certain brand of feminism that opposes the nail polish detection method. Less rapes equals less potential members which means less money and most damaging less political power over men as well as women.

    Now emotionally I wish no one would have to defend themselves against drugs in their drinks of any kind. Yet wishing and hoping does not change a culture of potential rape. What does change this behavior is a deterent. Emotionally how does the potential rapist feel knowing among the attendees some might have detection nail polish. Even if they slip a drug into their intended targets drink undetected as they watch discreetly how will they feel as their potential victim tests the drink. Then get a new drink, alert the staff and now are on the look out for them next time. Emotionally it is empowering and gives strength to women.

    The nail polish defense destroys this practice of slipping drugs into drinks. People who do this days are numbered if they continue as the chances of finding them increases each time they try. For some people this will increase the thrill, but most who do this are cowards or opportunists. This new defense will decrease their numbers.

    Plus as an added bonus feminists like the ones above will be detected as easily as dripping a defensive nail polish into a drink revealing their idealogy for what it really is: insane.

  5. William J. Green

    Brilliant! Absolutely genius. With more women reasoning like this more good, philogynist men could and would get behind more women. It’s the crazies that eschew a great product made by men for women that drives so many of us crazy and leads us to conclude most women are not only not from Venus but not from this universe.

    My hat’s off to you. Thanks for this. I’ll be sharing it widely.

  6. How do you begin to stamp out the so-called “Rape Culture”? By pro-actively catching the actual proto-rapists in the act and either literally “beating them to a pulp” or figuratively in a legal sense. The Roofie-Alarm nail polish can be a useful tool as part of this process. Exposing a few of the jerks in the act, and following up with appropriate retribution can only serve pour encourager les autres. But obviously, radical feminists are not really interested in addressing the problem as it exists in reality.

  7. When I was a Marine, we were always told “Gain and maintain situational awareness.” A lot of mishaps & assaults were ruthlessly dissected with questions like: “Did Lance Corporal Smucatelli have good SA?”

    (All too often the answer was “no.” We had a saying in the Marines: “There are no real victims, just volunteers.” Yes, it’s a harsh worldview, but the battlefield is extraordinarily harsh. Being alive to have hurt feelings is vastly preferable to being dead with one’s delicate sensibilities unruffled.)

    Good instincts MAY save your neck; but KNOWLEDGE is your best weapon against being victimized.

    Anything that gains one more situational awareness is good, whether it’s simply becoming fully aware of one’s surroundings, having friends who you know will have your back, or a bit of nail polish that reacts with a roofie. Not using these tools doesn’t mean you’re a bad person. It means that you’re rolling the dice on the outcome, that’s all.

    Not using this doesn’t excuse the rapist. It’s all on him. The rapist chooses evil. (And for those who think evil can be educated out of us: evil is a defect of spirit, not a defect of intellect. Ted Bundy was an intelligent, well-read man; and he committed a horrific string of rapes and murders.)

    Also, consider this: knowing that there’s someone dropping roofies may not only save you from being raped, it may save others. I submit that while protecting yourself is well and good, protecting others is even better.

  8. i think the science is faulty. not consistent. product recalls? lawsuits? but, if women acted as if it work, they ordered new drinks whether using the polish or not – that would set a tone. or, bringing your own glass with a cover that would sound an alarm if breached would be just as effective. think? now we would be selling designer glass not polish. william

  9. Jack comes home from work and forgets to lock the door behind him. He fixes himself a little dinner and a beer and sits in his favourite chair to eat and watch tv. He falls asleep.

    He wakes up to find a knife to his throat and a stocking-faced thug demanding to know where he keeps his valuables. Jack resists. Jack is murdered.

    Is it Jack’s fault because he forgot to lock his door? It’s true that if Jack had locked his door, it wouldn’t have been so easy for the killer to get in the house. Maybe he wouldn’t have persisted.

    Would it be better if locks had never been invented so that the morally-challenged couldn’t say “Jack forgot to lock his door, so he was asking for it”?

    Or was it all Jack’s fault because he resisted? Of course, if he hadn’t resisted, he might have been killed, too. Maybe resisting was his only *chance* to save himself, but it just didn’t work.

    The criminal is the one who is at fault for the crime, no matter what Jack did or didn’t do. A criminal is not a robot or an animal with no capacity to be morally responsible for his actions. He’s a human being. He’s chosen to prey on other human beings. If it weren’t for his kind, we wouldn’t need to spend money on locks or defensive weapons or clever nail polish. We shouldn’t *have* to have those things. It shouldn’t have to be a worry if we forget those things. And when we forget to use those precautions and somebody victimizes us, *it’s the criminal’s fault that we had something to forget in the first place.*

    As long as we are human and have human minds, and thus have to make moral choices, there will always be people who make the crappy criminal choices. Their choice, their fault.

  10. […] week I wrote about how I was roofied. Are there risks associated with going out to socialize? Absolutely. Acknowledging risks does not […]

  11. […] I Was Roofied Twice: Idiot Feminists Oppose Prevention … – This new nail polish that can detect the date rape drug is great if you think women aren’t trying hard enough not to get raped. — kelly oxford (@kellyoxford) August …… […]

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